Current Media Anxieties

download    http://www.getmilked.com/comics/DontWorryDesensitizedViolence.html

The media has formed different anxieties about the negative outcomes it has on its consumers. In today’s society current mass media production is being debated on whether the media is victimising children into behaving violently. Albert Bandura’s theory suggests that the children are taught violence by their surroundings.

In Albert Bandura’s social learning theory, children observe the people around them behaving in various ways. This is illustrated throughout the Bobo Doll Experiment. Albert Bandura states “behaviour is learned from the environment through the process of observational learning.” Bandura’s point being that violence is taught. In todays day and age exposure to violence is cumulative in its effects that violence on the screen ‘cultivates’ violence in society. Children are exposed at a young age to violence whether it be a cartoon on tv for example “The Simpsons” the tv show exposes violence to kids of all ages and within the tv show the children idolise “Itchy and Scratchy” who are renowned to kill each other brutally, but unrealistic expectations come from the show teaching kids that if your head is cut off it’s okay because that character will survive and there will be another episode. However, in comparison to the tv show for example Call of Duty, the video game. The child is now controlling the  character so already the child is performing violent acts via the character. Then we question the thought will the children think it is okay to perform these acts in society because they think it is socially acceptable. They don’t know right from wrong because what they are being taught in the video game is acceptable and if you don’t kill you will lose.

It is estimated that by the time an average child leaves elementary school, he or she will have witnessed 8,000 murders and over 100,000 other acts of violence. By the time that child is 18 years-of-age; he or she will witness 200,000 acts of violence, including 40,000 murders.’   https://moodle.uowplatform.edu.au/pluginfile.php/378037/mod_resource/content/1/CopyLecture2BCM1102015.pdf

So it goes back to Bandura’s theory violence is taught and looking at the statistics an average child is exposed to multitudinous murders and acts of violence, therefore, in this day and age children are more susceptible to violence.

References:

http://www.simplypsychology.org/bandura.html

http://www.getmilked.com/comics/DontWorryDesensitizedViolence.html

https://moodle.uowplatform.edu.au/pluginfile.php/378037/mod_resource/content/1/CopyLecture2BCM1102015.pdf

https://moodle.uowplatform.edu.au/pluginfile.php/378037/mod_resource/content/1/CopyLecture2BCM1102015.pdf

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One thought on “Current Media Anxieties

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  1. Hey Maddy!
    What a great post! The modern day example of violence in Itchy and Scratchy from The Simpsons in comparison to Albert Bandura’s Bobo Doll experiment is fantastic. Not only does it point out how children can almost come to justify violent acts because the characters simply reappear in the next episode, but also how children worship and adore the show as they are generally harboured from other violent material. You clearly stated and explained Bandura’s theory and I found it very interesting to read the statistics about the sheer number of violent acts children are witness to during their development.
    The only improvement I could really suggest would be to mention other possible explanations of why children might commit violent acts as opposed to purely just exposure through the media. Such as in the case of the murder of Jamie Bulger. Both of the children who committed the murder had experiences of family dysfunction, poverty, alcoholism, marital breakdown or neglect. Which many suggest played a far more significant role in shaping their behaviour than exposure to violence through the media.

    Overall it was a concise and very informative piece of writing! 🙂 🙂

    Like

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